Thursday, April 24, 2014 9:29 AM PT
By IULIA FILIP 

          MANHATTAN (CN) - A multibillion-dollar copyright dispute over the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie franchise belongs in California, the Walt Disney Co. told a federal judge. 

By MARK THOMPSON 

          MANHATTAN (CN) - Celebrity chef Lidia Bastianich must face claims that she took advantage of an Italian looking to break into the restaurant business, a New York appeals court ruled. 

By HEATHER JOHNSON 

          SAN FRANCISCO (CN) - A federal judge approved settlement of a class action accusing Apple and Best Buy of deactivating iTunes gift cards before they were redeemed, without issuing refunds. 

By JACK BOUBOUSHIAN 

          (CN) - After exposing whale trainers to "recognized hazards," SeaWorld must pay a fine and implement more safety measures during killer whale performances, the D.C. Circuit ruled. 

By JACK BOUBOUSHIAN 

          (CN) - The D.C. Circuit approved the Postal Commission's plan to end DVD-mailer discrimination - and Netflix's favored status at the U.S. Postal Service - by equalizing the postage for DVD flats and letters. 

By JACK BOUBOUSHIAN 

      (CN) - An agent may be entitled to half of the profits from MSNBC's "The Ed Show" if he can convince a jury that the eponymous talking head intended to partner with him, the D.C. Circuit ruled. 

By ROSE BOUBOUSHIAN 

          (CN) - Attorneys who successfully fought a middle schooler's suspension for posting a raunchy faux MySpace profile of her principal will recover more than $275,000, a federal judge ruled. 

By ADAM KLASFELD 

          MANHATTAN (CN) - After failing to defend a federal lawsuit, one of the makers of "Def Jam Rapstar" must stop selling the video game and fork over $535,000 to EMI and other record labels for copyright infringement -- if anyone can find them, a federal judge ruled. 

By JONNY BONNER 

          (CN) - A group of children who accused Facebook of misappropriating their names and likenesses failed to present "a viable legal theory," a federal judge ruled.

By JOE HARRIS 

     ST. LOUIS (CN) - A federal judge ordered collectibles dealers to pay Warner Bros. $2.57 million for violating copyright on The Wizard of Oz, Gone with the Wind and Tom and Jerry products. 

By ADAM KLASFELD 

     MANHATTAN (CN) - A federal judge gave the green light to a defamation suit against the National Enquirer's corporate parent for a story stating that Bobby Brown and Whitney Houston had "an intimate relationship before her death." 

By NICK MCCANN 

          (CN) - The estate of Nina Simone's former husband and business partner should not have the legal right to a number of Simone's recordings, a federal magistrate judge found. 

By NICK DIVITO 

          MANHATTAN (CN) - An oft-collared street artist who defends the right to peddle on New York City sidewalks without a license can advance retaliation claims, a federal judge ruled.

By DAN MCCUE 

          (CN) - A Muslim-American group can press some, but not all, of its claims against the men who allegedly spied on it and then wrote a book based on stolen records, a federal judge ruled.

By ANNIE YOUDERIAN 

          (CN) - Twitter has the right to respond to a temporary gag order sought by the government, a federal judge ruled, saying he was forcing the government to "disclose its intention to silence Twitter." 

By ERIK DE LA GARZA 

     AUSTIN (CN) - A Texas man who says he was teased decades ago because he shares a first name with the cross-dressing character in "Tango & Cash" does not have a defamation case, a federal magistrate said. 

By ANNIE YOUDERIAN 

     (CN) - A federal judge on Friday certified a class action accusing Apple of conspiring with five major publishers to fix the prices of e-books sold between April 2010 and May 2012. 

By LORRAINE BAILEY 

     CHICAGO (CN) - Live Nation concertgoers who walk or take public transit must still pay the parking fee embedded in the price of their tickets, the 7th Circuit ruled. 

By WILLIAM DOTINGA 

     (CN) - Internet service providers can be ordered to block copyright-infringing websites if the rights of users and the ISPs are also protected, Europe's highest court ruled Thursday. 

By MARLENE KENNEDY 

           BUFFALO, N.Y. (CN) - Five former Buffalo Bills cheerleaders seek a state court's help to get paid for their work on and off the football field - for which they claim they were paid as little as $105 a season.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

          LOS ANGELES (CN) - James Franco's former talent manager embezzled one-third of the star's commissions and diverted them to his own company without telling partners at his management firm, a partner claims in court.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - Actress-singer Ronee Blakley sued the father of her daughter for $3 million, claiming he defamed her by portraying her as a bad mother in his screenplay for the contemporary retelling of the Henry James novel "What Maisie Knew."

By DAVID LEE 

      (CN) - A fan of punk band Dropkick Murphys was injured when she was invited on stage to sing, the woman claims in court.

By NICK MCCANN 

          PORTLAND, Ore. (CN) - A mother sued her son's school district for suspending the boy for calling a teacher a "bitch" who "needs to be shot" on his Facebook page.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

      LOS ANGELES (CN) - David Letterman's production company Worldwide Pants broke a promise to pay a royalty collector its share of proceeds from cable and satellite transmission royalties for the "Late Show" and "Late Late Show," the collector claims in court.

By DAN MCCUE 

          MANHATTAN (CN) - Yasgur Road Productions sued the Town of Bethel, N.Y. for trying to prevent it from staging a "Woodstock reunion" at the Yasgur Farm, where the music festival was held in 1969.

By ELIZABETH WARMERDAM 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - The host of Spike TV's "Bar Rescue" attacked a bar owner after the show's producers encouraged the man to hit on the host's wife, the man says in Superior Court.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

          LOS ANGELES (CN) - MGM claims in court that an NBCUniversal screenplay about the formation of British spy agency MI6 violates copyright on the "James Bond" movies.

By NICK DIVITO 

      MANHATTAN (CN) - Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay purposefully drove his popular Los Angeles eatery out of business and used a business partner's investment to open another restaurant without him, the investor claims in a $10 million lawsuit.

By DAVID LEE 

          DALLAS (CN) - The mother of an injured motorcycle jumper seeks to depose the operators of a circus in which her son ran into a concrete wall and has been in a medically induced coma since.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

          LOS ANGELES (CN) - Netflix defamed a former executive by claiming he stole its secrets after leaving the "cold and hostile" company to take a job at Amazon, and used its close business ties with the online retailer to get him fired, the man claims in court.

By ADAM KLASFELD 

          MANHATTAN (CN) - French and British courts must produce witnesses for a U.S. songwriter who wrote two tunes for Elvis and is engaged in a protracted legal battle with most of the digital music industry, a federal judge ruled.

By DAN MCCUE 

     MANHATTAN (CN) - A publicist claims in court that Hasbro owes him $1 million in commissions for boosting sales of Scrabble, the 76-year-old board game.

By DAVID LEE 

     DALLAS (CN) - Dancers at a Rick's Cabaret International-owned gentlemen's club beat and stabbed a fellow dancer while management refused to call the police, the woman claims in a lawsuit.

By MEGAN GALLEGOS 

     SAN FRANCISCO (CN) - An animator claims in court that Disney copied "original elements" of her snowman character in the movie and trailers for the $1 billion smash hit "Frozen."

By ELIZABETH WARMERDAM 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - The daughter of a late Hollywood producer sued MGM, claiming it miscalculates home video revenue, shortchanging her and other profit participants of royalties, in a class action in Superior Court.

By MARLENE KENNEDY 

     WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (CN) - Two companies behind a Beatles musical revue claim in court that proceeds from the "Rain - A Tribute" tour should not be "held hostage" by their partners because of a separate copyright dispute.

By ANNIE YOUDERIAN 

     (CN) - A price-fixing conspiracy among Apple and five leading publishers put an independent ebook store out of business, BooksOnBoard claims in court, echoing a lawsuit brought by the government nearly two years ago.

By IULIA FILIP 

     MIAMI (CN) - Enraged that a customer got most of Target's Jason Wu collection, a fashion mob attacked him and his wife while store security egged them on, and someone posted their pictures online with the label "fashion vultures," the man claims in court.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - "NCIS" star Pauley Perrette sought restraining orders against her ex-husband Francis Shivers, who now claims in court that his ex-wife is gaming the court system and terrorizing him.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - Former "Jersey Shore" star Katie Cazorla claims in court that a website designer held domain names for her nail salon for "ransom" and refuses to give them back.

By HEATHER JOHNSON 

     OAKLAND, Calif. (CN) - Dealing a blow to a civil lawsuit by two cheerleaders, the U.S. Department of Labor said Wednesday that Raiderettes in Oakland are "seasonal" employees not subject to federal minimum wage laws.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - British metal label Earache Records claims in court that a U.S. distributor owes it $250,000 in licensing fees, and broke a promise to release a catalog of hundreds of albums.

By MATT REYNOLDS 

     LOS ANGELES (CN) - Though it enjoys a virtual monopoly of the Los Angeles cable-television market, Time Warner Cable has withheld nearly $10 million in fees, the city claims in court.

By CHRIS FRY 

     CAMDEN, N.J. (CN) - A high school unconstitutionally barred a girl from her graduation and prom because of a tweet from her home in which she called her principal a "pussy ass bitch," the girl and her mom claim in Federal Court.

From MASHABLE 

     Vice journalist Simon Ostrovsky was taken by militia in Eastern Ukraine after filing a series of compelling video dispatches from Ukraine since early March. Read more from Mashable.

From GIGAOM 

     AT&T, the nation's second largest broadband provider and wireless company, is creating a streaming video service thanks to a $500 million joint venture with the Chernin Group, a producer of a variety of television and media content. Read more from GigaOm.

From LOST REMOTE 

     Univision is continuing to invest in digital content, this time with a brand new "over-the-top" network, Flama. Read more from Lost Remote.

From THE WASHINGTON POST 

     Netflix took a swing at Comcast's $45 billion bid for Time Warner Cable, arguing in a shareholder letter that the merger would create a single company with too much power over the delivery of high-speed Internet service. Read more from The Washington Post.

From BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK 

     Aereo contends that its retrans-mission isn't a public performance because each viewer's Aereo antenna can only receive a particular signal-meaning there are a thousand audiences of one, rather than a public audience of a thousand. Read more from Bloomberg Businessweek.

From NEW YORK LAW JOURNAL 

     A trial judge's order barring Lifetime Entertainment from airing a dramatized movie on the murder of a beloved Appellate Division, Third Department, clerk was an "unconstitutional prior restraint on speech," the Appellate Division, Third Department, held in a unanimous opinion. Read more from New York Law Journal.

From VARIETY 

     SAG-AFTRA is holding off on filing grievances against advertisers who have not yet adopted the standard digital identifier - dubbed Ad-ID - mandated for ads using union members. Read more from Variety.

From THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 

     A day after the deadline, with many of the 850 cable services being forced to black out MTV, Nickelodeon and other channels, the two sides are poised to announce a deal. Read more from The Hollywood Reporter.

From THE WALL STREET JOURNAL 

     Four large trade associations representing competing sectors of the telecommunications and internet industry banded together to urge members of the European Parliament to back their views on net neutrality. That joint statement was unique, coming as it did from fierce competitors. Read more from The Wall Street Journal.

From NATIONAL JOURNAL 

     But the agency might still regulate negotiations between websites and Internet providers. Read more from National Journal.

From THE NEW YORK TIMES 

     As prosecutors use boastful rap lyrics to assemble criminal cases, a debate has arisen over whether such songs can constitute evidence of guilt or even the intention of wrongdoing. Read more from The New York Times.

From THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 

     The Court of Justice of the European Union ruled on Thursday that Internet Service Providers in Europe can legally block piracy sites that illegally distribute copyright-protected material. Read more from The Hollywood Reporter.

From THE WASHINGTON POST 

     A court granted a stay against the Twitter ban. But the government has 30 days to comply. Read more from The Washington Post.

By MULTICHANNEL NEWS 

     Last year was a mixed bag for traditional TV news, with the first increase in viewership for local TV news in five years, but cable news trending down. Read more from Multichannel News.

From THE NEW YORK TIMES 

     At least until the end of this decade, viewers will have to navigate between multiple streaming services to watch the movie or TV show they want. Read more from The New York Times.

From THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 

     Lauren Greenfield has scored the big victory that likely ends David Siegel's attempt to punish the filmmaker over "The Queen of Versailles." An arbitrator at the Independent Film and Television Alliance ruled that the documentary about the time-share baron wasn't defamatory. Read more from The Hollywood Reporter.